Saturday, April 23, 2022

Pic(k) of the Week: Rare Sarracenia oreophila, blooming

Rare Sarracenia oreophila, blooming

The yellow blossom of an endangered, carnivous(!) green pitcher plant, growing in the wild, on the bank of a pond, in Legacy Park of the city of Decatur, Georgia, USA. 16 April 2022.

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The more you know...

Sarracenia oreophila, also known as the green pitcher plant, is a carnivorous plant in the genus Sarracenia [growing in wetland environments].

In early spring, the plant produces large, yellow flowers with 5-fold symmetry. The yellow petals are long and strap-like, and dangle over the umbrella-like style of the flower, which is held upside down at the end of a 20-inch long (50 cm) scape. The stigma of the flower are found at the tips of the 'spokes' of this umbrella.

In late spring, the plant devlops highly modified leaves in the form of pitchers that act as pitfall traps for prey, such as small insects. The narrow pitcher leaves are tapered tubes that rise up to 30 inches (75 cm) from the ground, with a mouth 2 to 4 inches (6-10 cm) in circumference.
Wikipedia.

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Now, the bad news

Native to the southeast U.S., the green pitcher plant is an extremely endangered species [due to human development and forest succession] and now only can be found in a handful of counties in northeast Georgia [including Decatur], southwest North Carolina, and northeast Alabama.
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Green pitcher plants, surviving

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  • Pic(k) of the Week: one in a weekly series of images posted on Saturdays, and occasionally —but not always (as is the case today)— with a good fermentable as the subject.
  • Photo 18 of 52, for year 2022. See it at Flickr: here.
  • Commercial reproduction requires explicit permission, as per Creative Commons.

  • Camera: Olympus OM-D E-M10 II.
    • Lens: Canon 50mm ƒ/1.4 FD
    • Settings: 50 mm | 1/125 sec | ISO 200 | ƒ/8.0
    • Peripheral: Fotodiox adapter

  • For more from YFGF:

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